M

anxieties of influence,
#art, etc


Marina Galperina
journalist / curator / misc
about / clips


managing editor of
ANIMAL New York


twitter: @mfortki





Kim Laughton talks about his artistic process. 

When satisfied with the composition, I send the file to my render farm. At this stage, a powerful computer simulates the realities we take for granted and after a period of time the image is formed.
The final render was Perfect for display in an online gallery.
The moneyed generally have difficulty finding meaning in digital images; for this audience it may be necessary to send the render to be painted in a Chinese factory. After the transition from pixel to paint everyone is happy and I’ll return to the bank to look for more inspiring scenes.

Kim Laughton talks about his artistic process.

When satisfied with the composition, I send the file to my render farm. At this stage, a powerful computer simulates the realities we take for granted and after a period of time the image is formed.

The final render was Perfect for display in an online gallery.

The moneyed generally have difficulty finding meaning in digital images; for this audience it may be necessary to send the render to be painted in a Chinese factory. After the transition from pixel to paint everyone is happy and I’ll return to the bank to look for more inspiring scenes.

Pointing a Finger at Tepco, Kota Takeuchi. Statement. Related: The Rise of Performance and Intervention in Japanese Contemporary Art 

ART THOUGHTZ: On Beauty, Hennessy Youngman

Sophie’s new column Radicals Of Retrofuturism.
likeapairofbottlerockets:

I’ll be discussing artifacts of the subversive technological past in the context of the world today. This first piece is about a radical 1970’s group called Computer People For Peace, their startlingly accurate predictions and their connections to the Black Panthers. 

Sophie’s new column Radicals Of Retrofuturism.

likeapairofbottlerockets:

I’ll be discussing artifacts of the subversive technological past in the context of the world today. This first piece is about a radical 1970’s group called Computer People For Peace, their startlingly accurate predictions and their connections to the Black Panthers. 

A failed Mountain. David OReilly: 

The way the game is presented publicly allows for it to be more of a discovery for people. It’s like that because I don’t want to oversell the game or create some expectation which may not be met in the eye of the player. The press has tended to focus on what the game’s website says rather than actually play the game.

A failed Mountain. David OReilly: 

The way the game is presented publicly allows for it to be more of a discovery for people. It’s like that because I don’t want to oversell the game or create some expectation which may not be met in the eye of the player. The press has tended to focus on what the game’s website says rather than actually play the game.

GIF extract form Hito Steyerl, How Not To Be Seen. A Fucking Didactic Educational .MOV File , 2013. HD video file, single screen, 14min via Rhizome Hito Steyerl, “Politics of Post-Representation” DIS:

Essentially I think it makes sense to compare our moment with the end of the twenties in the Soviet Union, when euphoria about electrification, NEP (New Economic Policy), and montage gives way to bureaucracy, secret directives and paranoia. Today this corresponds to the sheer exhilaration of having a World Wide Web being replaced by the drudgery of corporate apps, waterboarding, and “normcore”. I am not trying to say that Stalinism might happen again – this would be plain silly – but trying to acknowledge emerging authoritarian paradigms, some forms of algorithmic consensual governance techniques developed within neoliberal authoritarianism, heavily relying on conformism, “family” values and positive feedback, and backed up by all-out torture and secret legislation if necessary. On the other hand things are also falling apart into uncontrollable love. One also has to remember that people did really love Stalin. People love algorithmic governance too, if it comes with watching unlimited amounts of Game of Thrones. But anyone slightly interested in digital politics and technology is by now acquiring at least basic skills in disappearance and subterfuge.

GIF extract form Hito Steyerl, How Not To Be Seen. A Fucking Didactic Educational .MOV File , 2013. HD video file, single screen, 14min via Rhizome 

Hito Steyerl, “Politics of Post-Representation” DIS:

Essentially I think it makes sense to compare our moment with the end of the twenties in the Soviet Union, when euphoria about electrification, NEP (New Economic Policy), and montage gives way to bureaucracy, secret directives and paranoia. Today this corresponds to the sheer exhilaration of having a World Wide Web being replaced by the drudgery of corporate apps, waterboarding, and “normcore”. I am not trying to say that Stalinism might happen again – this would be plain silly – but trying to acknowledge emerging authoritarian paradigms, some forms of algorithmic consensual governance techniques developed within neoliberal authoritarianism, heavily relying on conformism, “family” values and positive feedback, and backed up by all-out torture and secret legislation if necessary. On the other hand things are also falling apart into uncontrollable love. One also has to remember that people did really love Stalin. People love algorithmic governance too, if it comes with watching unlimited amounts of Game of Thrones. But anyone slightly interested in digital politics and technology is by now acquiring at least basic skills in disappearance and subterfuge.

MoMA PS1: GCC: Achievements in Retrospective
On view March 23–September 7, 2014

Consisting of a “delegation” of nine artists, the GCC makes reference to the English abbreviation of the Gulf Cooperation Council, an economic and political consortium of Arabian Gulf nations. Founded in the VIP lounge of Art Dubai in 2013, the GCC makes use of ministerial language and celebratory rituals associated with the Gulf to create videos, photographs, sculptures, and installations that examine the region’s rapid transformation in recent decades.

This exhibition, their first in the US, is presented in the format of a retrospective. The exhibition’s title, Achievements in Retrospective, intentionally plays with the idiosyncratic grammar reflected in bureaucratic Arabic-English translations as well as the kind of international English pervasive at global summits. As a retrospective for a nascent collaborative, the exhibition offers a prospective view, alluding to works that have yet to be made—not unlike the aspirational nature of some projects in the Gulf.

By intentionally focusing on contemporary Gulf culture, the collective seeks, in their own words, to “excavate the undocumented culture” of the region. They make use of the images and objects that circulate in social and political spheres to examine Gulf culture as it unfolds in the present day. The particulars of office environments, markers of achievement, and ceremonial acts become the raw material from which the GCC creates work addressing the very content it employs. Through the guise of an inter-governmental body, the GCC investigates notions of regional and national identity by sharing their achievements with the rest of the world.

GCC delegates are Nanu Al-Hamad (b. 1987, Kuwait City; lives in New York), Khalid Al Gharaballi (b. 1981, Kuwait City; lives in Kuwait City), Sophia Al Maria (b. 1983 Tacoma, WA; lives in London), Abdullah Al-Mutairi (b. 1990, Kuwait City; lives New York), Fatima Al Qadiri (b. 1981, Dakar; lives in New York), Monira Al Qadiri (b. 1983, Dakar; lives in Beirut), Aziz Al Qatami (b. 1979, Kuwait City; lives in Kuwait City), Barrak Alzaid (b. 1985, Kuwait City; lives in Dubai), Amal Khalaf (b. 1982, Singapore; lives in London).

Pharmakon, “Bang Bang” (Nancy Sinatra)

I played David OReilly’s new Mountain game. Features:

no controls
automatic save
audio on/off switch
time moves forward
things grow and things die
nature expresses itself
~ 50 hours of gameplay
once generated, you cannot be regenerated

 ♡ Got my Bunny Rogers Cunny Poem book in the mail  ♡

Rhizome presents:Internet as PoetryIssue Project Room 22 Boerum PlaceBrooklyn, NY 11201Wednesday, July 2nd at 8:00 pm Official New York launch for Cunny Poem v. 1 by Bunny Rogers and Brigid Mason featuring reading, music, and dance performance.

 ♡ Got my Bunny Rogers Cunny Poem book in the mail  

Rhizome presents:
Internet as Poetry
Issue Project Room 
22 Boerum Place
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Wednesday, July 2nd at 8:00 pm 

Official New York launch for Cunny Poem v. 1 by Bunny Rogers and Brigid Mason featuring reading, music, and dance performance.

Art-Band MSHR Makes Sound From Light And Light From Sound 

MSHR’s stage is one giant musical instrument, a sculpture made of mirrors and fluorescent plastic. It’s laser-cut into latices of glyphs connected by wires, with plates curving into square, kaleidoscope shapes and lasers cutting through the fog. Their other instruments are custom-built from analog synthesizers, optical sensors, oscillators, light bulbs, microphones and seashells. As they perform, moving slowly, dragging objects — the sound controls the lights which control the drone which controls the strobe. Sound is light. Light is sound. Everything is everything. “We’re playing light-audio feedback…”

Psyched I finally got to interview/shoot MSHR. Many props to Aymann for the edit.

What, you think crazy Russians all learned English en masse and went off to comment on articles? If it looks like Kremlin shit, smells like Kremlin shit, and tastes like Kremlin shit too — then it’s Kremlin shit. Pro-Russia troll army, exposed
Eva and Franco Mattes, Emily’s Video (2012)installation view, Postmasters Gallerysingle channel video, color + soundspeople’s reactions to a mysterious video that was later destroyedrunning time: 15:52 minutesedition of 3 + AP

Eva and Franco Mattes, Emily’s Video (2012)
installation view, Postmasters Gallery
single channel video, color + sounds
people’s reactions to a mysterious video that was later destroyed
running time: 15:52 minutes
edition of 3 + AP

Emily’s Video exposes the dark side of such relatively clean and unimaginative fun. A 16-minute compilation of reactions from people who replied to the artists’ online call to watch “the worst video ever” (which a girl named Emily delivers like a pizza), the work simply records respondents’ reactions via webcam. Some blanch, others laugh nervously, look away, or involuntarily gag or scream. Near the end, a curly haired, American Apparel model type pulls a blanket around herself and sobs. The Matteses don’t show us the source video’s content — they went so far as to secure each participant’s confidentiality and subsequently destroyed the seemingly appalling footage. But it’s probably sufficient to know what one “volunteer” blogged post-viewing: “We make we sick.” Christian Viveros-Fauné, “Eva and Franco Mattes Dive into the Dark Web in New Tribeca Show” The Village Voice

"We make we sick."
Nam June Paik, TV Bed (1972/1991)Now at at James Cohan, Art Basel Hong Kong

Nam June Paik, TV Bed (1972/1991)
Now at at James Cohan, Art Basel Hong Kong